A horrific crash between an Ottawa transit bus and a Via passenger train has left six people dead, dozens injured and many residents shaken and searching for answers as to what went wrong.
The OC Transpo Route 76 bus was heading for downtown Ottawa Wednesday morning, travelling north along the Transitway, the dedicated road for the city’s buses.
Shortly before 9 a.m., the bus collided with Via Train 51, which came from Montreal and was heading west to Toronto, at a rail crossing near Woodroffe Avenue and Fallowfield Road.
CBC

A horrific crash between an Ottawa transit bus and a Via passenger train has left six people dead, dozens injured and many residents shaken and searching for answers as to what went wrong.

The OC Transpo Route 76 bus was heading for downtown Ottawa Wednesday morning, travelling north along the Transitway, the dedicated road for the city’s buses.

Shortly before 9 a.m., the bus collided with Via Train 51, which came from Montreal and was heading west to Toronto, at a rail crossing near Woodroffe Avenue and Fallowfield Road.

CBC

Congrats to the Tim’s, from Winnipeg, who won the first Amazing Race Canada!

Congrats to the Tim’s, from Winnipeg, who won the first Amazing Race Canada!

An Ontario hospital is capitalizing on the controversy (and, to editorialize, ridiculousness) of Quebec’s “values charter” by putting advertisements in Quebec university newspapers to lure healthcare workers to the province.
Lakeridge Health, a facility located outside Toronto, has placed these ads in McGill student newspapers. 
CBC

An Ontario hospital is capitalizing on the controversy (and, to editorialize, ridiculousness) of Quebec’s “values charter” by putting advertisements in Quebec university newspapers to lure healthcare workers to the province.

Lakeridge Health, a facility located outside Toronto, has placed these ads in McGill student newspapers. 

CBC

Members of Parliament will return to work on October 16, after a 120 day summer recess.

Members of Parliament will return to work on October 16, after a 120 day summer recess.

Today the Quebec government unveiled its plan to ban public servants from wearing religious symbols to work. The first three images indicate “non-ostentatious” religious symbols that may be worn by public service employees, while the bottom five depict “ostentatious” symbols that would be banned.
The proposals by the Quebec government of Premier Pauline Marois would prohibit the wearing of “overt and conspicuous” religious symbols by government employees — from judges down to day-care workers.
From Canada’s Federal Employment Minister, Jason Kenney: “At the federal level, we believe our job is to make all people who live in this country — regardless of their religious, ethnic, cultural background — feel welcome, feel part of our country, feel like this is a land of equality of opportunity … We are very concerned by any proposal that would limit the ability of Canadians to participate in our society and that would affect the practice of their faith … And we are very concerned by any proposal that would discriminate unfairly against people based on their religion, based on their deepest convictions.”
NDP Leader Tom Mulcair and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau have also spoken out against Quebec’s proposed laws.
NP

Today the Quebec government unveiled its plan to ban public servants from wearing religious symbols to work. The first three images indicate “non-ostentatious” religious symbols that may be worn by public service employees, while the bottom five depict “ostentatious” symbols that would be banned.

The proposals by the Quebec government of Premier Pauline Marois would prohibit the wearing of “overt and conspicuous” religious symbols by government employees — from judges down to day-care workers.

From Canada’s Federal Employment Minister, Jason Kenney: “At the federal level, we believe our job is to make all people who live in this country — regardless of their religious, ethnic, cultural background — feel welcome, feel part of our country, feel like this is a land of equality of opportunity … We are very concerned by any proposal that would limit the ability of Canadians to participate in our society and that would affect the practice of their faith … And we are very concerned by any proposal that would discriminate unfairly against people based on their religion, based on their deepest convictions.”

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau have also spoken out against Quebec’s proposed laws.

NP

The leaked image of what could be Canada’s 2014 Olympic hockey jersey, sported by Jonathan Toews.
The image was posted to Getty Images and quickly pulled down, with Hockey Canada releasing a statement that the jerseys will be revealed on October 8. NP.
Thoughts?

The leaked image of what could be Canada’s 2014 Olympic hockey jersey, sported by Jonathan Toews.

The image was posted to Getty Images and quickly pulled down, with Hockey Canada releasing a statement that the jerseys will be revealed on October 8. NP.

Thoughts?

Harper is finally releasing the book he’s been talking about for years in November of this year. Above is the cover, which was released to media today.
Harper wrote the book with the help of a full-time researcher and well known hockey writer Roy McGregor. 

Harper is finally releasing the book he’s been talking about for years in November of this year. Above is the cover, which was released to media today.

Harper wrote the book with the help of a full-time researcher and well known hockey writer Roy McGregor. 

Vancouver has been ranked as the world’s third most-livable city in an annual survey by an independent business associated with the Economist magazine.

Toronto and Calgary placed fourth and fifth, but Melbourne took the top spot for the third year in a row in a report by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

G&M

Players left Canada’s Olympic orientation camp in Calgary knowing the road to proving they belong in Sochi begins now.
Coach Mike Babcock wanted each player to know what it would take to make the team, but it’s up to general manager Steve Yzerman and his staff to start evaluating once the regular season gets underway.
“The final scouting for the management group to put the final roster together begins immediately,” Yzerman said.
That’s a lot of pressure all around, when the expectation in Canada is nothing short of a gold medal. Team Canada’s management group has a representative from every division — the Boston Bruins’ Peter Chiarelli, the Detroit Red Wings’ Ken Holland, the St. Louis Blues’ Doug Armstrong and the Edmonton Oilers’ Kevin Lowe — so the spotlight will be bright.
Yzerman expects to have the roster figured out by mid-to-late December. The deadline for all countries to submit is Dec. 31.
NP

Players left Canada’s Olympic orientation camp in Calgary knowing the road to proving they belong in Sochi begins now.

Coach Mike Babcock wanted each player to know what it would take to make the team, but it’s up to general manager Steve Yzerman and his staff to start evaluating once the regular season gets underway.

“The final scouting for the management group to put the final roster together begins immediately,” Yzerman said.

That’s a lot of pressure all around, when the expectation in Canada is nothing short of a gold medal. Team Canada’s management group has a representative from every division — the Boston Bruins’ Peter Chiarelli, the Detroit Red Wings’ Ken Holland, the St. Louis Blues’ Doug Armstrong and the Edmonton Oilers’ Kevin Lowe — so the spotlight will be bright.

Yzerman expects to have the roster figured out by mid-to-late December. The deadline for all countries to submit is Dec. 31.

NP

A woman in Vancouver had her bike stolen, and a friend found it up for sale on Craigslist. She went to meet the seller, asked for a test drive, and stole the bike back.
Awesome.

A woman in Vancouver had her bike stolen, and a friend found it up for sale on Craigslist. She went to meet the seller, asked for a test drive, and stole the bike back.

Awesome.

That Justin Trudeau has dabbled with pot likely surprised few in Canada. However, his recent admission that he took his last puff just three years ago is provocative.
We’re used to politicians saying they tried marijuana in their carefree youth. And used to them drastically playing down the amount they smoked – that is, if they actually inhaled at all. But these types of political confessions stopped being news a long time ago.
What’s different about Mr. Trudeau’s divulgence is his acknowledgment he did it just a few years ago, while an MP. And, not insignificantly, while the possession of marijuana was still a criminal offence in this country – and remains so. That is either politically brave or stupid. It is without question refreshingly honest.
It’s doubtful Mr. Trudeau and his advisers would not have considered the potential fallout of his story about sharing a joint with friends at his Montreal home. (He also said he’s only tried marijuana five or six times in his life, and has never done other hard drugs). They likely determined that those who might be offended by his revelation were probably disinclined to vote for him anyway.
They also likely decided that the vast majority of Canadians would probably shrug at the news. So he took a puff at a dinner party. It’s a scene played out in living rooms and backyard patios among young professionals like Mr. Trudeau every day. Pot is the parlour drug of choice for many urbanites, and long has been. Many prefer its mellow effect to the toll of an evening of drinking.
In Vancouver, of course, you can’t walk along a downtown street without encountering pot’s pungent odour. I can assure you, Mr. Trudeau did not hurt himself on the West Coast with his frank disclosure. And certainly the young people who have been drawn to his political crusade aren’t going to punish him. Rather, they will laud him for his candour.
The stigma that once existed around marijuana has mostly dissipated. Almost every week another group is calling for its legalization. Mr. Trudeau himself recently came out in support of it. Health professionals across the country have long pointed out it’s time to legalize and regulate the sale of cannabis the way we do alcohol.
Even south of the border, where the war on drugs was lost a long time ago, some U.S. states have moved to legalize cannabis. So far, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has shown no interest in moving down this road. Even if Mr. Harper believed that heeding the many calls to decriminalize pot was the right thing to do, he likely couldn’t do it. The Conservative base would never forgive him.
Consequently, this allows Mr. Trudeau to look more enlightened on the subject, more in tune with modern thinking. A vast majority of Canadians support decriminalizing marijuana because it makes sense. Why clog up an already overburdened court system with people nailed for having a bit of weed in their possession?
It will be intriguing to see what the Tories do with Mr. Trudeau’s revelation. Will they make a big deal out of the fact that he was breaking the law when he lit up? This, by a man who purports to want to run the country! They had no qualms about making fun of Mr. Trudeau for being a drama teacher. Will they now propose his marijuana use confirms he’s as big a flake as they’ve been suggesting?
Over the years we’ve learned that when it comes to trying to destroy political opponents, the Conservatives will do, and say, just about anything.
I would suggest, however, that going after Mr. Trudeau on this matter will not get the traction the Tories are seeking. If anything, it may just make Canada’s governing party look dated, out of touch and even a little paranoid.
A great commentary from the Globe and Mail on Trudeau’s recent admission that he has smoked pot as an MP. 

That Justin Trudeau has dabbled with pot likely surprised few in Canada. However, his recent admission that he took his last puff just three years ago is provocative.

We’re used to politicians saying they tried marijuana in their carefree youth. And used to them drastically playing down the amount they smoked – that is, if they actually inhaled at all. But these types of political confessions stopped being news a long time ago.

What’s different about Mr. Trudeau’s divulgence is his acknowledgment he did it just a few years ago, while an MP. And, not insignificantly, while the possession of marijuana was still a criminal offence in this country – and remains so. That is either politically brave or stupid. It is without question refreshingly honest.

It’s doubtful Mr. Trudeau and his advisers would not have considered the potential fallout of his story about sharing a joint with friends at his Montreal home. (He also said he’s only tried marijuana five or six times in his life, and has never done other hard drugs). They likely determined that those who might be offended by his revelation were probably disinclined to vote for him anyway.

They also likely decided that the vast majority of Canadians would probably shrug at the news. So he took a puff at a dinner party. It’s a scene played out in living rooms and backyard patios among young professionals like Mr. Trudeau every day. Pot is the parlour drug of choice for many urbanites, and long has been. Many prefer its mellow effect to the toll of an evening of drinking.

In Vancouver, of course, you can’t walk along a downtown street without encountering pot’s pungent odour. I can assure you, Mr. Trudeau did not hurt himself on the West Coast with his frank disclosure. And certainly the young people who have been drawn to his political crusade aren’t going to punish him. Rather, they will laud him for his candour.

The stigma that once existed around marijuana has mostly dissipated. Almost every week another group is calling for its legalization. Mr. Trudeau himself recently came out in support of it. Health professionals across the country have long pointed out it’s time to legalize and regulate the sale of cannabis the way we do alcohol.

Even south of the border, where the war on drugs was lost a long time ago, some U.S. states have moved to legalize cannabis. So far, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has shown no interest in moving down this road. Even if Mr. Harper believed that heeding the many calls to decriminalize pot was the right thing to do, he likely couldn’t do it. The Conservative base would never forgive him.

Consequently, this allows Mr. Trudeau to look more enlightened on the subject, more in tune with modern thinking. A vast majority of Canadians support decriminalizing marijuana because it makes sense. Why clog up an already overburdened court system with people nailed for having a bit of weed in their possession?

It will be intriguing to see what the Tories do with Mr. Trudeau’s revelation. Will they make a big deal out of the fact that he was breaking the law when he lit up? This, by a man who purports to want to run the country! They had no qualms about making fun of Mr. Trudeau for being a drama teacher. Will they now propose his marijuana use confirms he’s as big a flake as they’ve been suggesting?

Over the years we’ve learned that when it comes to trying to destroy political opponents, the Conservatives will do, and say, just about anything.

I would suggest, however, that going after Mr. Trudeau on this matter will not get the traction the Tories are seeking. If anything, it may just make Canada’s governing party look dated, out of touch and even a little paranoid.

A great commentary from the Globe and Mail on Trudeau’s recent admission that he has smoked pot as an MP. 

Above is Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird. This week, Baird made public his attempts to sway Russia away from its new anti-gay laws, saying:

As concerned as we are about the Olympics, that’s nothing. That’s two, three, four weeks for the athletes and participants and the visitors … This mean-spirited and hateful law will affect all Russians 365 days of the year, every year. It is an incitement to intolerance, which breeds hate. And intolerance and hate breed violence.

Baird has gone under fire by a conservative women’s group in Canada, accusing him of pushing his private agenda using a public platform. Baird spoke out assuring Canadians that the vast majority of people here support the government’s stance, and that “political and religious freedoms, rights of women and sexual minorities are Canadian values that the government promotes around the world.”
A+ to Mr. Baird.
from the NP

Above is Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird. This week, Baird made public his attempts to sway Russia away from its new anti-gay laws, saying:

As concerned as we are about the Olympics, that’s nothing. That’s two, three, four weeks for the athletes and participants and the visitors … This mean-spirited and hateful law will affect all Russians 365 days of the year, every year. It is an incitement to intolerance, which breeds hate. And intolerance and hate breed violence.

Baird has gone under fire by a conservative women’s group in Canada, accusing him of pushing his private agenda using a public platform. Baird spoke out assuring Canadians that the vast majority of people here support the government’s stance, and that “political and religious freedoms, rights of women and sexual minorities are Canadian values that the government promotes around the world.”

A+ to Mr. Baird.

from the NP

RIP James Gray, former keyboardist for Blue Rodeo, who died Monday a the age of 52. Gray suffered a fatal heart attack in Toronto, walking home from a performance. 
Gray joined Blue Rodeo in the early 1990s and his first album with the band was the multi-platinum Five Days in July, which included such hits as Hasn’t Hit Me Yet and Bad Timing. He left Blue Rodeo in 2005 after contributing to six albums.
G&M

RIP James Gray, former keyboardist for Blue Rodeo, who died Monday a the age of 52. Gray suffered a fatal heart attack in Toronto, walking home from a performance. 

Gray joined Blue Rodeo in the early 1990s and his first album with the band was the multi-platinum Five Days in July, which included such hits as Hasn’t Hit Me Yet and Bad Timing. He left Blue Rodeo in 2005 after contributing to six albums.

G&M

Police have issued an Amber Alert for a nine-year-old boy who is believed to have been abducted in the Niagara Region of southern Ontario.
Joseluis Resendiz is described as Hispanic, four-foot-six, 65 pounds with dark hair and was last seen wearing a blue soccer t-shirt (Messi-Barcelona), blue plaid shorts and blue Adidas running shoes. He has a birthmark on his left wrist and a metallic replacement tooth on the right side of his mouth.
Niagara Regional police are trying to find the boy’s mother, identified as Tivisay Rojas-Castano, and his uncle, identified as Edison Rojas-Castano.
Police say both adults are believed to have fled the City of Niagara Falls with Joseluis in a grey four-door 2007 Mazda sedan with the Ontario licence plate BRAV 280.
They say the three may be in either Toronto or Hamilton.
In a tweet Thursday morning, police spokesman Const. Derek Watson said “the boy and mother were seen in the area of Hurontario / Dundas street Mississauga last night at 9:15.”
Watson said the boy and his father are U.S. citizens who live in Georgia and were in Niagara Falls for a family visit to Marineland.
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Amber Alert was cancelled after the boy was located in Toronto.

Police have issued an Amber Alert for a nine-year-old boy who is believed to have been abducted in the Niagara Region of southern Ontario.

Joseluis Resendiz is described as Hispanic, four-foot-six, 65 pounds with dark hair and was last seen wearing a blue soccer t-shirt (Messi-Barcelona), blue plaid shorts and blue Adidas running shoes. He has a birthmark on his left wrist and a metallic replacement tooth on the right side of his mouth.

Niagara Regional police are trying to find the boy’s mother, identified as Tivisay Rojas-Castano, and his uncle, identified as Edison Rojas-Castano.

Police say both adults are believed to have fled the City of Niagara Falls with Joseluis in a grey four-door 2007 Mazda sedan with the Ontario licence plate BRAV 280.

They say the three may be in either Toronto or Hamilton.

In a tweet Thursday morning, police spokesman Const. Derek Watson said “the boy and mother were seen in the area of Hurontario / Dundas street Mississauga last night at 9:15.”

Watson said the boy and his father are U.S. citizens who live in Georgia and were in Niagara Falls for a family visit to Marineland.

1 / 2

Amber Alert was cancelled after the boy was located in Toronto.